CFPB News

Read the latest on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

 

Items 101 - 120 of 163  Previous123456789Next
  • CFPB Issues Truth in Lending Interim Rule 
    ReverseMortgageDaily 29 Dec 2011
    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has issued a final interim rule under Regulation Z that creates new requirements under the Truth in Lending Act. While the rule is the same as its predecessor under the Federal Reserve Board, which previously had purview over Reg Z, all reference to the Fed has been stripped and the CFPB has taken over as the governing body. "This interim final rule does not impose any new substantive obligations on regulated entities," CFPB officials said. Reg Z implements the Truth in Lending Act, which falls under Dodd-Frank, currently overseen by the CFPB. The watchdog is working to consolidate the Truth in Lending Act and RESPA mortgage disclosure documents in order to create a form that consumers can better understand. It has issued several new rounds of mortgage disclosure form drafts for consumer and industry feedback as it hones in on the new disclosures.
  • US Watchdog Eyes Zero Interest Mortgage Plan 
    Financial Times 21 Dec 2011
    The Federal Housing Finance Agency is considering a "principal paydown plan" that would allow bankruptcy judges to grant underwater mortgage borrowers in Chapter 13 proceedings a five-year reprieve from interest rates. Housing experts have underline principal balance relief as the best avenue for propping up the battered market, which is being dogged by $700 billion in negative equity. According to CoreLogic, about a quarter of homeowners owe more on their mortgage than the property is currently worth. And the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys estimates that half of all pending bankruptcy cases involve residential mortgage claims. Although the White House is not considering the plan, the FHFA does not need congressional approval to implement the initiative, which would target homeowners with government-insured loans.
  • CFPB's Petraeus Targets Gaps in Financial Education, Services for Military 
    American Banker 19 Dec 2011
    A recent forum hosted by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Office of Servicemember Affairs focused on the gap in financial education among members of the military and indicated that the office will work with federal and state agencies to raise awareness about consumer protection issues, such as payday loans. In early 2012, servicemembers will have access to an education product via computer or smartphone that enhances the financial aid course provided during basic training. Military spouses, typically left in charge of household finances during deployments, may soon have access to a similar education product. Meanwhile, the office is promoting programs offered by banks and credit unions to servicemembers as alternatives to payday loans, allowing them to obtain short-term, small loans with 12 percent to 18 percent interest rates.
  • CFPB Seeking Whistleblower Tips on Lending Violations 
    American Banker 16 Dec 2011
    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has announced that it will start accepting information from whistleblowers about potential violations of federal consumer financial laws. The watchdog has launched a toll-free hotline and dedicated e-mail for tips, and it plans to launch an online tips portal on its Web site early next year. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, employees who report their firms for possible violations are protected from retaliation, termination, and discrimination. However, the bureau noted that it will penalize individuals who provide frivolous tips or those in bad faith. Employees can report suspicions anonymously or can request that their information is kept confidential if they do submit their names and contact information.
  • Banks Press CFPB in Talks 
    Wall Street Journal 14 Dec 2011
    The five largest mortgage banks -- Ally Financial Inc., Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., and Wells Fargo & Co. -- the Obama Administration, and state attorneys general are working on an agreement to settle claims related to the use of "robo-signing," in which employees approved documents without proper review, and other questionable foreclosure practices. However, the settlement, which could be worth about $19 billion, could be held up as banks seek broad releases from state and federal authorities, including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, that would relinquish the authorities' right to sue over flawed mortgage originations. The CFPB is said to be resisting the banks' demands that it forgo the authority to sue, but banks say that without the release the deal is dead. Because Republicans have not confirmed the CFPB director nominee, Richard Cordray, he was unable to participate in negotiations and the agency would not have the authority to agree until mid-July. Negotiations with CFPB were halted when Congressional members objected.
  • Now You Can Send Your Mortgage Horror Story Directly to the CFPB 
    Business Insider  12 Dec 2011
    Months after its launch, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is now accepting complaints about mortgages. According to the agency, it has dedicated a special section of its Web site to the mortgage industry. Unlike its student loan section, which allows consumers to post complaints on a public message board, the watchdog will accept a form from consumers with mortgage grievances identifying the type of trouble that has been encountered. The CFPB said that all who submit a complaint will receive a tracking number to follow the status of their complaint, and the submissions will go directly to the lenders. According to a report by the Center for Responsible Lending, more than 2.7 million homeowners who obtained mortgages between 2004 and 2008 have lost their homes to foreclosures. However, the agency cannot regulate the industry until a director has been appointed.
  • Both Parties Seek Edge as Nominee Is Blocked 
    Wall Street Journal 09 Dec 2011
    U.S. Senate Republicans blocked White House nominee Richard Cordray, who was selected to serve as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The vote was 53-to-45 in favor of Cordray's nomination, but short of the 60 votes necessary to force consideration of his nomination. Republicans have vowed to block any nominee until the bureau is modified, while Democrats say that the filibuster merely demonstrates Republicans political posturing at the expense of consumers. The White House could consider a recess appointment for the CFPB, though it is unclear if that move is technically possible. Republicans want the CFPB to be led by a board of directors rather than a single director, among other changes. Without a director, the agency cannot regulate nonbank financial firms, even though it can enforce current consumer protections. Democrats are hopeful that the public support for improved consumer protections will work against Republicans who opposed Cordray's nomination. Republicans, on the other hand, are hopeful that their vote against the nominee will demonstrate the party's willingness to dial back government bureaucracy. The White House had issued a media blitz in Maine, Indiana, Nevada, and Tennessee seeking the support of Republican senators that the administration thought were most likely to support Cordray, but the efforts did little to change those senators' votes. U.S. Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) did vote with Democrats in favor of Cordray, keeping his word, while U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) did not vote either way, merely voting "present."
  • Consumer Bureau Introduces 2-Page Credit Card Agreement 
    Plain Dealer 07 Dec 2011
    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Dec. 7 introduces its new credit card agreement, which is easier to understand. The abbreviated form decreases the lengthy credit card disclosures from 5,000 words to about 1,000 in a two-page document. The agency is unveiling its "Know Before You Owe" campaign in Ohio, just one day before the Senate is scheduled to vote on whether to confirm Richard Cordray as the bureau's first official director. Forty-four of 46 GOP senators have pledged to block confirmation of the director unless the bureau's structure and funding are dramatically scaled back. "Every day we go without a consumer watchdog in place is another day when a student, or a senior citizen, or member of our Armed Forces could be tricked into a loan they can't afford," warned President Barack Obama. He has promised to veto any measure that would delay, defund, or dismantle the new rules set up by the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul. A recent report by the bureau found that there is widespread confusion over credit card terms.
  • Senators Wrangle Over Consumer Protection 
    Roll Call 06 Dec 2011
    U.S. Senate Democrats are pushing for the confirmation of Richard Cordray as the first director of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) as they build campaign momentum to demonstrate they are "guardians of the middle class." One Democratic aide said, "We think this is a bellwether vote to determine if you are on the side of consumers." GOP aides suggest that the push is merely to score political points and not obtain confirmation for Cordray given that Democrats have not reached out to address Republican concerns about the CFPB. U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) could cut off debate on the nomination on Dec. 6, which could push for a vote on Dec. 8. It is unclear if Democrats will have enough Republican votes to reach the required 60 votes necessary to overcome the filibuster. A recent White House National Economic Council report said, "Without a director, the CFPB cannot fully supervise non-bank financial institutions such as independent payday lenders, non-bank mortgage lenders, non-bank mortgage servicers, debt collectors, credit reporting agencies, and private student lenders." Republicans say that the CFPB should be set up like other agencies with a board, of which no more than three commissioners could belong to the same political party. They also would prefer the funding for the agency go through the congressional appropriations process.
  • White House Pushes for Confirmation of Consumer Watchdog Nominee 
    Washington Post 04 Dec 2011
    The White House issued a new report to pressure U.S. Senate Republicans to support the Obama Administration's nomination of Richard Cordray as the first director of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). GOP lawmakers continue to block any CFPB nominee unless significant changes are made to the agency, but the White House is pushing for support as the full Senate is expected to vote on Dec. 8 on Cordray's nomination. Along party lines, members of the U.S. Senate Banking Committee voted to approve Cordray's nomination in October, but 45 of the chamber's 47 Republicans have issued a letter vowing to block his nomination, which would ensure that the Senate falls short of the 60 votes necessary to confirm Cordray's appointment. The National Economic Council's recent report said that the CFPB is "hamstrung" because it cannot exercise its full powers until a director is confirmed, noting the CFPB "cannot provide the kind of oversight and transparency that consumers need." Raj Date, who succeeded Elizabeth Warren as special adviser to the treasury secretary in charge of setting up the bureau, has said, "Independent funding of the CFPB and other bank supervisors ensures that we are not at the mercy of outside influences when it comes to protecting consumers or ensuring the safety and soundness of our nation’s financial institutions." If the nomination of Cordray fails to pass, President Barack Obama could appoint him during the winter recess.
  • CFPB, Agencies Form Task Force to Crack Down on Mortgage Modification Scams 
    American Banker 02 Dec 2011
    A new task force will investigate and shut down scams that specifically target homeowners attempting to complete loan workouts through the Home Affordable Modification Program. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Treasury Department, and the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program created the joint task force to educate struggling homeowners and help them to recognize modification scams. The task force has issued a consumer fraud alert with tips for avoiding scams and will distribute it directly to homeowners eligible for HAMP. The alert informs borrowers where and how they can apply for the program and reminds them that only their mortgage servicer has the authority to approve a modification. Additionally, it cautions consumers to conduct due diligence if an upfront payment is requested, money-back guarantees are offered, or they are advised to cease mortgage payments or stop contacting their servicer.
  • CFPB Begins Work to Streamline Consumer Financial Regulations 
    American Banker  30 Nov 2011
    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is seeking input on ways to streamline regulations under the consumer financial laws it inherited from other regulators under Dodd-Frank. The bureau issued a notice and request for information asking the public to identify the regulations most in need of updating or elimination because they are outdated, overly burdensome or unnecessary. It also asked for suggestions on how to make complying with the rules easier. "Our goal is to make it easier for banks, credit unions and others to follow the rules," said Raj Date, the bureau's interim leader. "We're asking the public to help us identify and prioritize concrete ways that we can streamline the regulations we inherited so that they work better for consumers and the firms that serve them."
  • Consumer Groups Urge CFPB to Impose Greater Protections for Prepaid Cards 
    American Banker 21 Nov 2011
    Consumer advocates are pressing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to extend greater protections for prepaid debit card accounts. A letter released on Nov. 18 and signed by seven advocacy groups asked the fledgling agency to clarify that the definition of "account" under Regulation E includes the pooled accounts into which funds accessed by prepaid cards are placed. The organizations -- the Center for Responsible Lending, National Consumer Law Center, and Consumers Union among them -- said the clarification is essential to ensure that prepaid card users have full consumer protections under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act. "As the cost of bank accounts continue to rise, more and more consumers are turning to prepaid cards as an alternative," stated Consumers Union senior attorney Michelle Jun. "But prepaid cards offer weaker protections than bank accounts and can be loaded with hidden fees that make them costly to use." To correct that, Consumers Union and the other advocates are requesting that the CFPB limit how much money consumers can lose if their card is stolen or lost; that card issuers be required to clearly and conspicuously disclose all fees upfront; and that overdraft fees on all prepaid cards be banned, among other protections.
  • CFPB Seeks Input for Joint Report on Private Student Loan Market 
    American Banker 17 Nov 2011
    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is requesting information from consumers, schools, and industry players on the student loan market as it begins work on a joint report to Congress. It is seeking such information as underwriting criteria for student loans, repayment terms and behavior, servicing and loan modification, and default avoidance. The notice and request for information, published Nov. 16, follows a handful of student loan initiatives announced by the Obama administration in October aimed at relaxing the burden of student debt. It also highlights the priority that the agency is putting on this niche of the financial industry. "The bureau is particularly interested in learning what information would help students make informed decisions about which financial services and products are right for them and what approaches would best assist recent graduates facing (or about to face) difficulty making private education loan payments," the notice said.
  • CFPB Official: Elder Financial Abuse 'Crime of the 21st Century' 
    American Banker  16 Nov 2011
    Elder financial abuse and exploitation is a significant and growing financial problem facing the America's senior citizens, a prominent official from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau told a Senate panel on Nov. 15. Hubert "Skip" Humphrey III, director of the bureau's Office for Older Americans, said the agency intends to partner with law enforcement and senior advocates to build awareness of elder abuse; address the underreporting of fraudulent or abusive practices aimed at this demographic; and coordinate more training on the matter for law enforcement and financial institutions. "It's been called a hidden epidemic or the Crime of the 21st Century, and it's a growing and serious problem that we need to address," Humphrey said. AARP Foundation Litigation senior attorney Julie Nepveu said more older Americans are reporting problems involving payday loans, debt collection, overdraft fees, and mortgage modifications. The CFPB's reach is limited, however, until permanent leadership is in place. "Too many seniors are struggling to meet the unfair terms of unscrupulous lenders looking to take advantage of their vulnerable state," explained Sen. Sherrod Brown, who chairs the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Protection. "Unfortunately, many of these activities are perpetrated by non-banks, and the CFPB does not have authority over these lenders until a full-time director is confirmed."
  • CFPB Kicks Off Phase 2: Simplifying Mortgage Closing Forms 
    ReverseMortgageDaily  08 Nov 2011
    Now that is has addressed the initial steps of the mortgage process, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is moving on to the other end of the deal: the disclosure forms for loan closings. The agency on Nov. 8 released two prototypes of the Truth in Lending Disclosure and the HUD-1 Settlement Statement -- the federal documents that list final loan terms and costs -- and it is working on amalgamating them and certain other federal disclosures into one simple-to-use form. "We believe the terms and costs on these disclosures should be similar to the ones you received when you first applied for the loan," the CFPB wrote in a recent blog post. "Being able to compare these terms and costs is what it means to 'know before you owe.'" The prototypes may not look shorter or easier to understand at first glance, the CFPB acknowledges, because they contain some new disclosures mandated under the Dodd-Frank Act. The regulator is accepting comment on the forms through Wed., Nov. 16.
  • Consumer Agency to Review Outdated Regs on Mortgages, Other Products 
    eCredit Daily 04 Nov 2011
    The newly formed Consumer Protection Financial Bureau is ready to begin reviewing copious regulations on mortgages and other common financial products affecting the lives of most Americans. The CPFB inherited many of the consumer-oriented divisions of existing U.S. agencies and now must "streamline and simplify rules" to guarantee that consumer lending and other services function properly and that lenders are sufficiently transparent, explained Raj Date, de facto head of the agency, before Congress on Nov. 3. "The Bureau has inherited from other agencies numerous regulations, many of which have been on the books for years," Date told the House Financial Services subcommittee, as he reviewed the watchdog’s first 100 days and touched on future challenges. "Changes in technology, market practices, and the legal landscape may have caused some of these rules to be obsolete, unnecessary, redundant, or counterproductive." Date said the review is to begin in November. In the meantime, he said the CFPB's first 100 days has accomplished a great deal, including the launch of consumer education campaigns; meetings with consumers, consumer advocates, civil rights organizations, trade groups, and industry representatives; hiring of an estimated 700 staffers, and initiation of on-site examinations of the country's biggest banks.
  • CFPB's First 100 Days Under Microscope at Hearing 
    MarketWatch 02 Nov 2011
    During a recent U.S. House Financial Services Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee hearing, Republican lawmakers said that the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) needs additional oversight, but Raj Date, special adviser to the Secretary of the Treasury on the CFPB, defended the bureau's work. He outlined the accomplishments of the agency in its first 100 days, noting that examinations of large banks had begun as well as efforts to clarify mortgage documents and student loans. The bureau also plans to review rules inherited from other agencies to reduce duplication, streamline regulation, and make updates, which Date said could help smaller firms. The CFPB is expected to face additional challenges once it has a director in place, which will enable the agency to supervise nonbank consumer-financial-product providers. However, the White House Nominee Richard Cordray continues to face Republican opposition in the U.S. Senate, as Republicans intend to block any nominee until the agency's structure is changed, including the replacement of the director position with a board. Date reiterated the CFPB's stance that its decisions will be "fact-based, pragmatic, and deliberative."
  • Rep. Frank: President Should Use Recess Appointment For CFPB Chief 
    Dow Jones Newswires 02 Nov 2011
    U.S. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) said on Nov. 2 that the president should use a recess appointment to name Richard Cordray as the director of the new U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) as Republicans continue to block any nominee until changes are made to the structure of the agency. Frank, other Democrats, and several consumer groups continue to push for the appointment of a permanent leader to the bureau because without a leader, the agency cannot use its full consumer protection powers. Republicans contend the new agency has too much authority over financial markets, and they are seeking a restructuring of the agency that would replace the director with a commission and provide other banking regulators with greater say over the agency's actions. If the president opts to use a recess appointment, it would circumvent the U.S. Senate approval process.
  • Consumer Agency Will Fight to Defend Service Members' Pocketbooks 
    Los Angeles Times 01 Nov 2011
    The federal government has introduced an initiative to prevent financiers from taking advantage of young, financially naive members of the military. To spearhead the effort, it enlisted Holly Petraeus, a longtime champion for military families who said that as an Army wife she was once preyed upon by a deceptive landlord. "I think a lot of people are surprised to think of the military as a target for unethical business practices or abuses," said Petraeus, head of the military affairs office at the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. "But the fact is that they have an absolutely guaranteed paycheck; it comes in twice a month, and they're not going to quit or be laid off." Those factors help make service members attractive targets for unscrupulous salespeople. So does their tendency to relocate often. "Military members move all the time, so they're constantly walking into new communities where they don't know the players," Petraeus points out. "They may go for the biggest billboard outside the front gate of the base, which may not be the one that will treat them the most fairly." Since being appointed this year, Petraeus has been visiting bases to learn how the military educates its enlisted persons and where it needs help. In September, her office began soliciting public input on financial products designed for service members and their families so her aides can craft better financial education and outreach initiatives. And although auto dealers managed to escape the purview of the CFPB, Petraeus says her office can at least educate them so that they do not agree to an unfavorable deal in the first place.
Items 101 - 120 of 163  Previous123456789Next