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Press Releases

March 22, 2013
Dealers should not be allowed to impose higher interest rates than necessary on consumers Yesterday the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced it would hold banks and other lenders liable for any auto loans in their portfolio that are discriminatory. We were encouraged by today's announcement and hope it is the first step toward eliminating unfair interest-rate markups by auto dealers. Dealers should not be allowed to sell a consumer a higher interest rate than necessary. A flat-fee system would ensure that the dealers have an incentive to provide the lowest interest rate...
December 12, 2012
In the first report of its kind, the Center for Responsible Lending examines consumer lending markets across-the-board and finds that—despite major gains in regulatory reforms—predatory lending continues to undermine American households trying to rebuild their finances after the recession. View or download the report: http://rspnsb.li/state-of-lending. The State of Lending in America and its Impact on U.S. Households (State of Lending) paints a picture of working families struggling to manage debt while coping with stagnant incomes and a substantial decrease in wealth. The...
April 4, 2012
Car dealers often target consumers with poor or no credit for yo-yo scams, a new CRL report demonstrates. "Yo-yo scams occur when a dealer leads a car buyer to believe financing is final," says CRL senior researcher Delvin Davis, author of the report, Deal or No Deal: How Yo-Yo Scams Rig the Game against Car Buyers. "The dealer lures the consumer back to the dealership, claims the financing fell through, and then pressures the consumer to agree to a new loan at a higher interest rate." For the full report go to: http://rspnsb.li/yo-yo-scams. The report also found that dealers involved in...
December 24, 2011
North Carolina has been – and I hope will continue to be – a leader in finding effective solutions to predatory lending. Over the past decade, our lawmakers struck an effective balance between strong financial markets and fair consumer protections, enacting laws that are now models for other states and Congress. In the area of housing, North Carolina has often been in the forefront. Our state was the first to establish protection against predatory mortgage lending. It regulated mortgage brokers and lenders, and passed laws to prevent some of the worst subprime loan abuses. And...
July 27, 2011
Over 38 million vehicles were financed through an auto dealer last year, with many loaded with abusive lending practices that cost Americans billions of dollars. Auto dealers often steer unsuspecting buyers into overpriced loans, especially when kickbacks from the bank to the dealer are involved. Until now such practices have continued largely unknown to consumers and unregulated, but new consumer protection laws have changed that by giving the FTC new oversight authority. In its new role, the FTC is holding fact-gathering sessions around the country. It will hold its second one, open to...
April 19, 2011
Consumers who financed a car through a dealership in 2009 will pay more than $25.8 billion in extra interest over the lives of their loans because of dealer interest rate markups, according to new research by the Center for Responsible Lending (CRL). This is an increase of 24 percent from 2007. CRL also found that undisclosed markups increase the odds that a subprime borrower will default by 12 percent and odds that he or she will end up having their car repossessed by 33 percent. The report, "Under the Hood: Auto Loan Interest Rate Hikes Inflate Consumer Costs and Loan Losses," examines...
April 11, 2011
Why: A car is the most common nonfinancial asset Americans own. For most it's a necessity, not a luxury. Too many families suffer at the hands of unscrupulous dealer-financed lending practices: New CRL research shows consumers pay over $20 billion each year in added, nontransparent dealer markups. "Yo-yo" sales and unnecessary service add-ons make car loans needlessly expensive for millions of consumers. What: Experts from the Center for Responsible Lending, the National Consumer Law Center, and the National Association of Consumer Advocates will take part in a roundtable held by the...
September 14, 2009
"On the anniversary of the costliest financial bailout in U.S. history, we back President Obama's renewed call for the creation of a new agency to bring commonsense oversight to the financial services industry and, in the process, protect consumers, taxpayers and the economy from a repeat of the current fiasco. The regulators responsible for making our financial system work have failed. That's clear from widespread foreclosures devastating millions of Americans and surrounding neighborhoods, from unfair bank overdraft fees and credit card practices that cost consumers tens of billions of...
July 13, 2009
A new policy brief by the Center for Responsible Lending chronicles the repeated failure of federal bank regulators over the years to rein in irresponsible lending practices. Example after example of regulatory delay or inaction demonstrates the need for a stand-alone, independent regulator focused solely on ensuring basic, common-sense safeguards for consumers. For the full report, please go here. Here are some examples of the regulatory lapses documented by CRL in its policy brief, titled "Neglect and Inaction: An Analysis of Federal Banking Regulators' Failure to Enforce Consumer...
July 10, 2009
During the surge of media attention on today's historic meeting between Pope Benedict XVI and President Barack Obama, it is important to note that only days before His Holiness used his own moral authority to express concerns for the current financial crisis. In his encyclical Caritas in Veritate (Charity in Truth), the Pope speaks to the developments that led to the current global economic crisis, naming badly-managed and short-sighted financial practices among its causes. He urges financiers to "rediscover the genuinely ethical foundation of their activity". Pope Benedict's words are...

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