Credit and Prepaid Card News

The latest news on the credit card and prepaid card industry from the Center for Responsible Lending.

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  • Credit Card Delinquencies Poised to Rise, FICO Survey Data Suggest 
    American Banker 04 Oct 2011
    Concern is growing that credit card delinquency rates, in a downward pattern for more than two years, may start to move up again if the economy stagnates, according to new FICO survey data. The credit-scoring firm, owned by Fair Isaac Corp., said that 40 percent of the 188 bank risk managers it polled in August expected credit card delinquencies to increase over the next six months. Roughly half of respondents -- 49.8 percent -- said they believed average credit card balances will rise over the next six months, although 63.9 percent found it unlikely that credit card use will return to pre-recession levels for another five years or more. Half of the risk-management executives predicted that it will be 2020 before U.S. home prices return to 2007 levels. Additionally, 48.3 percent of respondents said they fear the country is on the brink of another economic downturn.
  • Discover Faces Enforcement Action From FDIC Over Fee Products 
    Dow Jones Newswires 28 Sep 2011
    The FDIC plans to issue an enforcement action against Discover Financial Services over its marketing of fee-based products, the company said in a regulatory filing Wednesday after market close. Discover's payment protection plan, also known as debt deferment, costs cardholders a fee of 89 cents per $100 in balances, allowing them to put monthly payments on hold in the event of job loss, hospitalization or other serious event. The company currently faces eight class action U.S. District Court cases stemming from the product. Discover says it entered a preliminary global settlement of all pending class action cases in June. U.S. consumers paid $2.4 billion in fees for payment protection plans on 24 million accounts in 2009, according to a March report from the Government Accountability Office based on data from nine credit-card issuers. "The products can protect a cardholder's credit rating in times of financial distress" but "can be difficult for consumers to understand," the GAO said.
  • Rev. Jackson Hits at Capital One 
    Wall Street Journal 28 Sep 2011
    Consumer advocacy groups and Rev. Jesse Jackson criticized Capital One Financial's business model at a hearing the Federal Reserve held in Chicago to allow the public a chance to comment on Capital One's planned acquisition of ING Direct USA. Jackson said the bank's credit card business is so risky it would pose a threat to the U.S. financial system. Despite Capital One's vows to hire new workers and invest in underserved communities, the civil rights icon said the bank markets expensive credit cards to vulnerable borrowers. The $9 billion deal would make the bank the fifth-largest in the nation based on deposits. Capital One's general counsel, John Finneran, denied that the bank is too entrenched in the credit card business, claiming that it paired down its cards beginning in 2005. Still, consumer interest groups such as the National Community Reinvestment Coalition oppose the deal, claiming the bank has a poor track record of unsavory lending.
  • Debit Fee Cuts Could Boost Credit Card Use -- Fed 
    American Banker 26 Sep 2011
    According to a Federal Reserve Bank of Boston research paper, new regulations reducing debit card interchange fees are causing some banks to charge customers more for using debit cards -- which, in turn, could result in customers ramping up use of their credit cards. While explicit debit card fees have not been the norm, Boston Fed policy adviser Joanna Stavins said it is "feasible" that banks will begin to add fees or per-transaction charges in an effort to recoup lost interchange revenue. The Fed's July 29 ruling will limit the fees that merchants pay to banks when customers make a purchase with their debit cards. The fees will drop to between 21 cents and 24 cents per transaction, down from 44 cents on average currently. In an attempt to make up for losses in the field, some big banks have already begun to charge customers for checking accounts or related debit cards. However, the rise in debit card fees could cause more consumers to use their credit cards, as there will be no fee attached to that card. "It is reasonable to expect that an increase in the cost of debit would lead to an increase in the use of credit cards," Stavins concluded.
  • Credit Card Debt on the Rise, Again 
    CNNMoney 22 Sep 2011
    Americans added $18.4 billion to their debt load in the second quarter, a 66 percent increase from the debt they accumulated in the same quarter last year and 368 percent more than they tacked on in 2009, according to credit card research firm CardHub.com. The last time consumers charged up this much debt during this time period was in 2008, when credit card balances climbed by $25.2 billion. Total outstanding credit card debt as of July was $792 billion, down 18 percent from the September 2008 peak of $972 billion, according to data from the Federal Reserve. CardHub estimates that consumers will run up about $54 billion more in credit card debt by the end of 2011 than they did in 2010. Helping to fuel the increase are credit card issuers, which have started to loosen their standards and extend credit to consumers with so-so credit again now that government regulations like the CARD Act and the debit card swipe fee cap have been finalized, says SmartCredit.com credit specialist John Ulzheimer. Additionally, debit card fees and disappearing debit rewards programs have driven many consumers back to credit cards.
  • Capital One's Business Model 'Not Sound,' Community Groups Tell Fed 
    Washington Post 20 Sep 2011
    Before a small crowd at the Federal Reserve's first in a trio of public hearings, Capital One Financial Corp. officials defended the proposed purchase of ING Direct as a union of simple, traditional institutions that pose no risk to the financial setup but produce enormous public benefit. Community groups countered that the credit card behemoth is simply using the $9 billion purchase to feed its card business, which if permitted to grow any larger could throw the system off balance. Analysts and regulators have pinpointed credit card securities as the likely driver of America's next financial crisis, and Capital One is too entrenched in the niche, according to National Community Reinvestment Coalition President and CEO John Taylor. "Capital One's business model is not sound," he declared. Stella Adams of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, meanwhile, has voiced fear that Capital One would increase its subprime credit card lending at a risk to minorities, on which she says the bank has preyed.
  • Debit or Credit? Citi Places Its Bet 
    Wall Street Journal 20 Sep 2011
    Citigroup mailed an estimated 346 million credit card offers to North American customers in the third quarter, according to figures from Mail Monitor -- more than one for every man, woman, and child in the United States. One in three credit-card offers that landed in consumers' mailboxes last month came from Citi, Mail Monitor estimates. The postal blitz is expected to make Citi the largest mailer of credit-card offers, ahead of longtime industry leader Chase, for the first time in eight years. It shows how Citi is trying to regain ground ceded to rivals after losing hundreds of millions of dollars on credit cards following the 2008 financial crisis. In its efforts, Citi is betting that customers, alienated by charges being imposed on debit cards, will turn to credit cards instead.
  • Credit Probes Go Beyond Scores 
    Atlanta Journal-Constitution 14 Sep 2011
    When consumers apply for new loans, request a store credit card, or sign up for a cellphone, the companies they do business with may delve more deeply into their credit history than they used to. Following the Great Recession, more lenders are sifting through consumers' personal financial information in ways they have never done before, according to industry experts and consumer groups. Additionally, they are more likely to rely on information other than just a traditional credit score. Data companies are now collecting information relevant to consumers' job history, income, and net worth -- which lenders can use to flag anyone it considers a credit risk. Consumer groups acknowledge that lenders should take greater care in their lending practices but worry that incorrect conclusions could actually impede some creditworthy borrowers when they attempt to get loans.
  • Consumer Debt Rises on Nonrevolving Surge; Credit Cards Fall 
    Dow Jones Newswires 08 Sep 2011
    U.S. consumer credit made another gain during July, led by a big increase in nonrevolving debt. Consumer credit jumped by $11.97 billion, according to the Federal Reserve. The surge in outstanding credit was the biggest in more than three years. Nonrevolving credit drove the overall increase in July, rising by $15.41 billion to $1.662 trillion. Revolving credit, which includes credit-card debt, fell by $3.44 billion to $792.48 billion. That July drop followed two promising increases. Consumer spending has slowed sharply this year, amid a 9.1% unemployment rate and only soft gains in workers’ earnings. The latest report by the Commerce Department on retail sales showed those rose in July less than forecast. Economic growth hasn’t met the Fed’s expectations and central bank officials have said they would keep interest rates at very low levels into 2013. Consumer spending has slowed sharply this year, amid a 9.1 percent unemployment rate and only soft gains in workers’ earnings. The latest report by the Commerce Department on retail sales showed those rose in July less than forecast. Economic growth has not met the Fed’s expectations and central bank officials have said they would keep interest rates at very low levels into 2013.
  • Banks Still Not Easing Credit Card Standards 
    Time 02 Sep 2011
    The Federal Reserve's most recent Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices finds that consumers are reining in their spending habits, with credit card late payments and card default rates falling steadily. The quarterly poll follows credit card activity at 55 U.S. banks and 22 foreign banks. The trend may appear to herald good news for individual spenders; but for those awaiting an economic rebound, the exact opposite is true. Less spending, even on credit, equals slower growth and fewer jobs. In addition, the Fed observes that banks are doing little to reverse the decline in credit card use. According to the Federal Reserve, fewer than 11 percent of U.S. banks queried report that they have loosened credit card lending standards. Additionally, only 18 percent of large banks say their credit card lending standards have "eased somewhat"; 0 percent of all banks say their card lending standards are "easing considerably"; and 78 percent of all banks and 63.6 percent of big banks say their credit card approval standards have remained "unchanged."
  • FTC Orders Refunds for Those Tricked Into Prepaid Cards 
    Credit.com 01 Sep 2011
    Thanks to a settlement reached by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), more than 110,000 consumers who applied for online payday loans but were deceived into paying for prepaid cards instead will soon be receiving a refund by mail. The total of $1.9 million is going back to consumers, but individual checks are likely to be just $10 to $15. According to the FTC, consumers were looking for loans online, but a cleverly designed application form tricked them into signing up for the Ever Private Card or the Secret Cash Card Debit Card. Applicants who inadvertently signed up for the cards paid up to $54.95. To ensure wary consumers that the refund checks are, in fact, being sent by the FTC, consumers can confirm that the check is legitimate on the FTC's Web site.
  • Recession Leaves Many in Permanent Cutback Mode 
    USA Today 30 Aug 2011
    New Federal Reserve Bank of New York data indicates that total U.S. household debt -- including mortgages -- has contracted by more than $1 trillion, or roughly 8.6 percent, since 2008's third quarter as the nation's consumers reacted to recession. While some of the decline can be blamed on banks tightening credit, making it tougher for people to borrow, the trend also can be attributed to more Americans abbreviating their mortgage terms, saving instead of spending, and using credit cards more judiciously. In the first three months of this year, for instance, 34 percent of home refinancers paid off a 30-year loan and shifted into a 20- or 15-year product. That is the highest level in seven years. Freddie Mac notes that fewer than 25 percent of the refis were "cash out" deals, as opposed to 67 percent in 2008, and 26 percent were actually "cash in" deals where borrowers boosted their equity instead of extracting it. Additionally, more account holders are paying off their credit card debt each month, suggesting that plastic is seen today as a way to earn rewards while making purchases rather than as a source of short-term loans. "There is a fundamental difference in how people are using credit cards" now, compared to before the recession, notes Silvio Tavares of payments processing company First Data.
  • JPMorgan, Wells Fargo Waive Fees for Customers Post-Irene 
    Bloomberg 29 Aug 2011
    JPMorgan Chase will not charge people in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut for late payments of credit cards, business and consumer loans, or overdraft-related fees from today through Sept. 4. The bank also will waive early withdrawal fees on certificates of deposit "to help customers with their cash flow" if needed, according to an e-mail JPMorgan Chase sent to customers. It will not charge consumers for using another bank's automated teller machine and will extend hours at branches in affected areas this week. Wells Fargo will waive fees for customers in the same states through Sept. 2 when they use another bank's ATM. Wells Fargo also will not charge early withdrawal fees on CDs. Bank of America will help customers facing financial hardship on a case-by-case basis, while Citigroup will work with customers depending on individual circumstances, offering different financial recovery assistance options. Capital One Financial is encouraging its customers affected by the hurricane to reach out in person at a branch, via phone, or online, if they are having issues with their credit card or banking needs.
  • In New Form, Debit Rewards Still Available 
    Tampa Bay Online  28 Aug 2011
    Several big banks in the past 12 months have terminated or scaled down their debit card rewards programs, blaming new regulation that soon will rein in the revenue they can wring from checking accounts. To compensate, a few banks have already begun partnering with retailers to offer revamped programs that reward customers for spending at particular stores. Under one program, for example, customers can receive a $5 rebate for using their debit cards to spend $25 or more at BestBuy.com. The move away from traditional rewards programs, where customers usually earn a predetermined cash-back rate on all purchases, is in response to the shifting business environment. Beginning in October, a regulation will limit the fees banks can collect from merchants whenever customers use debit cards. These fees brought in $19.7 billion in 2009, according to the Nilson Report, which follows the payments industry.
  • Capital One Deal With ING Could Be Slowed by Federal Reserve 
    Politico 25 Aug 2011
    The Federal Reserve has hinted it may slow down a deal allowing Capital One to acquire ING Direct's U.S. operation, which would create the fifth-largest U.S. bank. Opponents say a merger would create a risky "too-big-to-fail" megabank. The Fed's board of governors this week ended public comment on the proposed merger, typically the last step before it approves a major deal, despite objections from activists and a letter from Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), the ranking member of the House Financial Services Committee. Frank and others wanted the board to remove the deal from fast-track approval so the impact on consumers, and allegations that Capital One has a poor track record in low-income and working-class communities, could be more thoroughly examined. In an unusual step, however, the board indicated it would allow more comment on the matter, potentially giving activists more time to present their case. A Federal Reserve spokeswoman said earlier this week that no decision on the merger was imminent.
  • Debit Rewards Are Still Available—in New Form 
    Associated Press 24 Aug 2011
    Debit card rewards are undergoing a transformation. Several major banks in the past year ended or scaled back their debit rewards programs. To compensate, a few banks are teaming up with retailers to offer revamped programs that reward customers for spending at specific stores. The migration away from traditional rewards programs is a response to the changing business environment. Starting in October, a regulation will cap the fees banks can collect from merchants whenever customers swipe their debit cards. Under the new reward programs, retailers pay the banks a fee or share a portion of the profits whenever customers act on an offer, which is expected to help banks offset the loss in revenue from swipe fees. Financial research firm Aite Group estimates that banks will reap $1.7 billion a year in revenue from these merchant-funded rewards by 2015. Aite found that about 30 percent of customers enrolled in merchant-funded programs end up redeeming at least one offer, a figure that could rise significantly once more retailers join the programs and the offers become more customized.
  • Know What You're Getting Into With Pre-Paid Debit and Credit Cards 
    Austin American-Statesman 21 Aug 2011
    Prepaid debit and credit card firms located in Central, Coastal, and Southwest Texas and the Permian Basin have been the subject of more than 320 complaints to the Better Business Bureau since January, according to Erin Dufner, senior vice president of communications for the Central Texas BBB. "There has definitely been an increase," she said, adding that the bureau has received more than 6,000 inquiries on the complaints. Problems occur with these cards, Dufner explained, when consumers use the prepaid cards as if they were regular credit and debit cards and encounter charges they are not accustomed to. Although prepaid cards do not usually have application and activation fees, they are host to a number of other charges generally not associated with traditional debit and credit card accounts -- such as fees for receiving print statements in the mail, for stripping the card of all its funds at once, and fees for spending more than the amount on the card.
  • Colleges and High Schools Offer Some Counseling for Credit Card Using Students 
    Republican & Herald (PA)  21 Aug 2011
    After reading the statistics on credit card use among college students -- 84 percent had at least one credit card in 2009, up from 76 percent in 2004, according to student loan giant Sallie Mae -- Kathy Loy thought she should do something to educate high school students on the risks. Loy, a business education teacher in Mahanoy Area, Pa., pushed the school's administration to offer a personal finance class and require that each junior at Mahanoy Area High School take the course. Loy said Mahanoy Area leapt at the opportunity early on, about five or six years ago, to offer the class that is now a nationwide initiative to promote financial literacy training in high school. Loy spends six to eight weeks talking about credit. "We talk about good versus bad credit. We look online to discuss which is the best credit card. We discuss the fees involved and analyze statements," she said. Learning credit card management could be beneficial for students, given that Sallie Mae's data indicates they own 4.6 credit cards on average, with half of college students having four or more card accounts. The research also produced the highest average credit card balance among students of any other study, at $3,173. And while the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 blocks issuers from promoting cards on campus, 38 percent of students polled by Sallie Mae said they chose their first credit card from a mail offer and 19 percent got a referral from a parent.
  • Debt Contraction Means Fewer Bankruptcy Filings, Chargeoffs 
    American Banker 19 Aug 2011
    Falling credit card chargeoffs have coincided with slowing bankruptcies despite a weak jobs environment. However, the favorable bankruptcy trend may itself simply be part of the broader phenomenon of the burn-off of bad loans that has allowed loss rates to improve. Chargeoffs of marginal accounts and tighter underwriting have isolated weaker borrowers, and less consumer credit means less debt to discharge in bankruptcy. Consumer credit has just begun to post year-over-year growth again, and the slack may be buying struggling households extra time, helping to sustain the decline in bankruptcy filings.
  • Americans Are Happier with Their Credit Cards, Thanks to CARD Act 
    American Banker 18 Aug 2011
    The latest annual survey by J.D. Power and Associates on credit card satisfaction finds that credit card customers are the happiest they have been since the financial crisis, thanks in part to a government crackdown on the card industry. The 2009 Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure Act made it more difficult for lenders to charge some fees and to raise interest rates, and also required issuers to simplify their disclosures to customers. "The transparency created by the legislation helped," says Michael Beird, director of banking services at J.D. Power and Associates. "We see it in fees and rates … and the [new] layout and design of people's statements were generally well-received," he adds. Overall credit card satisfaction rose to 731 on J.D. Power's 1,000-point scale in 2011, from 714 in 2010.
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